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Проект на тему : «Чай и чаепитие в Англии: вчера и сегодня.»

  • Проект на тему : «Чай и чаепитие в Англии: вчера и сегодня.»

  • Учеников 6 «А» класса:

  • Рудковской Анны

  • Новожиловой Елизаветы

  • Машель Александры

  • Пармузина Дениса.

  • Научный руководитель – учитель английского языка Власкина Людмила Витальевна.

  • Москва, 2008.




Задачи проекта:





Практическая значимость данной работы состоит в том, что разработанная программа может быть использована в классах с углубленным изучением английского языка, с одаренными детьми (как дополнительные уроки).



Место и роль чая в английской жизни.

  • Место и роль чая в английской жизни.

  • История покорения Англии.

  • Коммерческая история чая.

  • Исторические традиции.

  • Чай в Англии сегодня.



Tea is one of the most important parts of English life….

  • Tea is one of the most important parts of English life….



The English drink tea with milk, pouring the milk first, and then the tea, without adding extra water.

  • The English drink tea with milk, pouring the milk first, and then the tea, without adding extra water.

  • The tradition is so strong that companies producing green tea, fruit tea and herbal tea write a warning on the package such as «Best served without milk» which nevertheless does not stop the English from creating the most awful drink of fruit tea and milk.



The famous English writer George Orwell proposed his own golden rules for brewing tea:

  • The famous English writer George Orwell proposed his own golden rules for brewing tea:

  • Tea should be from India or Ceylon.

  • Tea should be brewed lightly in a porcelain or pottery teapot and mixed with boiling water in a cup.

  • The teapot should be warmed, not by using water ,which spoils the taste, but on the shelf over the fire.

  • Tea must be strong.

  • Tea leaves should be placed directly in the teapot so that they can float freely and not in little bags,nets or packets.

  • The brew should be poured into the boiling water.

  • Having brewed the tea, it should be stirred or, even better, shaken.

  • Tea should be drunk from high cylindrical cups.

  • Cream should be removed from the milk before the milk is added to the tea.

  • First pour the tea and only then pour the milk.

  • Tea should be never be drunk with sugar, which spoils the taste.



Tea only appeared in England in the middle of the seventeenth century from China.

  • Tea only appeared in England in the middle of the seventeenth century from China.



In the seventeenth century, the English became interested in the drink.

  • In the seventeenth century, the English became interested in the drink.

  • In the eighteenth century, tea «traditions» started to appear and tea was for the most part, enjoyed by the wealthier members of society.

  • By the nineteenth century, tea was drunk at all levels of society.

  • In the twentieth century, tea became a usual and integral part of life .



The first records of tea being bought in London shops start appearing at the beginning of the 1650s. The first known advertisement announcing the sale of tea is in a copy of the English newspaper Mercurius Politicus from 1658.

  • The first records of tea being bought in London shops start appearing at the beginning of the 1650s. The first known advertisement announcing the sale of tea is in a copy of the English newspaper Mercurius Politicus from 1658.



Tea was used for medicinal purposes.

  • Tea was used for medicinal purposes.

  • Tea was also considered to cure headaches, gall bladder pains, and was used as a tonic to «chase away sleep and lighten the heart».



Tea became a social drink, to a significant extent taking this role away from alcoholic drinks.

  • Tea became a social drink, to a significant extent taking this role away from alcoholic drinks.



In the seventeenth century, people were still drinking tea after the Chinese fashion: served in small Eastern bowls and brewed in small important teapots.

  • In the seventeenth century, people were still drinking tea after the Chinese fashion: served in small Eastern bowls and brewed in small important teapots.

  • Then the enterprising English had already started to produce special tea services.



First the English liked their tea (green tea)sweet and added either sugar or honey to it.

  • First the English liked their tea (green tea)sweet and added either sugar or honey to it.

  • Milk came later.

  • Then English liked to drink black tea.



Paradoxically, the first tea served in public places was sold in coffee houses. Coffee houses first appeared in the 1650; the first of traditionally thought to have opened in Oxford, than in London.

  • Paradoxically, the first tea served in public places was sold in coffee houses. Coffee houses first appeared in the 1650; the first of traditionally thought to have opened in Oxford, than in London.



The English thought that tea is:

  • The English thought that tea is:

  • A drink for the whole family;

  • A drink for quiet people (мирные обыватели);

  • A ceremonial drink.



How did tea make its way from far off China into the cups of the ordinary English?

  • How did tea make its way from far off China into the cups of the ordinary English?

  • The route tea took to England was a difficult and long one.





In the eighteenth century, tea finally became the national drink throughout England.

  • In the eighteenth century, tea finally became the national drink throughout England.



The high price of tea , caused by the length and difficulty of transporting it to England, the sale price grew noticeably as a result of the large tax set on it by the government (which by 1784 was 119%).

  • The high price of tea , caused by the length and difficulty of transporting it to England, the sale price grew noticeably as a result of the large tax set on it by the government (which by 1784 was 119%).



In the 18-th century the illegal trade in tea took on gigantic proportions. Smugglers working on their own, in groups , sometimes under the patronage of government figures brought up to half of the tea drunk in the country.

  • In the 18-th century the illegal trade in tea took on gigantic proportions. Smugglers working on their own, in groups , sometimes under the patronage of government figures brought up to half of the tea drunk in the country.



And finally, great success was enjoyed by the producers of so – called (false-подделка ) tea in other words with something added in.

  • And finally, great success was enjoyed by the producers of so – called (false-подделка ) tea in other words with something added in.



In 1706, Thomas Twining opened a coffee house which also sold tea. It became a shop selling tea and tea shop.

  • In 1706, Thomas Twining opened a coffee house which also sold tea. It became a shop selling tea and tea shop.

  • The Twinings tea company became an emblem of the aristocracy (In business Twinings held on to their traditions, not lowering ) prices or going into mass production, but relying on quality and the refinement of the taste.

  • As a result, they were one on the last to produce tea in standard packages.

  • Their diligence paid off: in 1837 the young queen Victoria named them as the official suppliers to the royal court.



Tea was brewed and poured by the mistress of the house.

  • Tea was brewed and poured by the mistress of the house.

  • Tea was brewed in the sitting room. (The water was often kept warm in special silver urns)

  • Tea always freshly brewed, strong and sweet.



The teaspoon played a large part, some of them even bearing a number so that the hostess did not get mixed up when topping up cups.

  • The teaspoon played a large part, some of them even bearing a number so that the hostess did not get mixed up when topping up cups.

  • A teaspoon placed on the pot of the cup indicated the end of tea drinking.



The tea ritual required special equipment: tea rooms, tea houses, tea furniture, tea services, tea gowns)

  • The tea ritual required special equipment: tea rooms, tea houses, tea furniture, tea services, tea gowns)



The Europeans particularly liked blue and white porcelain .

  • The Europeans particularly liked blue and white porcelain .

  • European artists initially copied Chinese and Japanese motifs on their porcelain items.

  • Much later it became fashionable to use European designs.



In the 19-th century, tea traditions in England became inviolable laws:

  • In the 19-th century, tea traditions in England became inviolable laws:

  • Afternoon tea

  • Five-o-clock

  • Tea for two

  • High tea



Much attention was also paid to the subjects of conversation while drinking tea. Conversation was the key component of the English «tea ceremony».

  • Much attention was also paid to the subjects of conversation while drinking tea. Conversation was the key component of the English «tea ceremony».



Everything on the table had to come together perfectly: the tea service, the tablecloth, the napkins, the flowers in the vase, the crockery and even, ideally, the refreshments.

  • Everything on the table had to come together perfectly: the tea service, the tablecloth, the napkins, the flowers in the vase, the crockery and even, ideally, the refreshments.



………..in iron boxes in aristocratic houses.

  • ………..in iron boxes in aristocratic houses.





Nowadays the English prefer Indian tea over others

  • Nowadays the English prefer Indian tea over others

  • Chinese tea is still without equal. It’ s drunk by connoisseurs and experts and it is increasingly coming back into fashion.



In London tea traditions remain, they are extremely upper-class and expensive.

  • In London tea traditions remain, they are extremely upper-class and expensive.

  • T he magnificent London hotels, which your average man in the street is only likely to see in films about aristocratic life , now serve afternoon tea to all who want to attend. This is a whole outing, an event for which one needs to prepare in advance. In some places you must order a table well in advance and dress formally, in other words a tie and jacket for the men.



Menu

  • Menu

  • Sandwiches:

  • -with smoked salmon

  • - with cream cheese and onion

  • - with egg and mustard

  • - with cucumber

  • - with cooked salmon and salad

  • - with beef and garlic

  • with fried turkey

  • Freshly baked rolls with home-made strawberry jam and whipped cream.

  • Special tarts and fruit-cake

  • Tea



In the South of England there are also the so-called cream teas.

  • In the South of England there are also the so-called cream teas.

  • Cream teas usually involve:

  • Hot rolls

  • Cream

  • Jam



English tea is still the best.

  • English tea is still the best.

  • Do not buy tea in supermarkets, where mass produced tea is gold.

  • Do not buy the cheapest tea.